Image courtesy The Florence Academy of Art, 2017

The nude figure has been a muse for academic painters for quite some time, and a celebration of this tradition is underway at one of the nation’s top ateliers, in New Jersey.

The Florence Academy is synonymous with representational and fine art excellence at home and abroad. Many of the atelier’s graduates have gone to establish incredible careers with major exhibitions and gallery representation.

The Academy is currently celebrating the tradition of academic nude drawing during a stunning group exhibition in early 2017. Opened on February 13, “Drawn to Life” features more than 14 masterful works on paper and is “a unique opportunity to view a rare collection of American, French, and Russian academic drawings and paintings that have been put together thanks to the generous loans from The Art Students League as well as private collectors and friends of the Academy,” the organization writes.

Among the artists included in the exhibition are Richard Tweedy, Augustus Vincent Tack, Louis Fancher, Victor Hecht, and Dennis Miller Bunker. Two rarely seen paintings by Abbott Thayer will also be on view.

“Drawn to Life” will remain on view through May 5. To learn more, visit The Florence Academy of Art.

This article was featured in Fine Art Today, a weekly e-newsletter from Fine Art Connoisseur magazine. To start receiving Fine Art Today for free, click here.

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Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the Editor of Fine Art Today and works as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.

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