Malou Flato, “Tokyo Fish,” 40 x 50 in. © Davis Gallery

Water does such amazing things to light and color — bending it, shaping it, and reflecting its visual spectrum of color. New works by this talented painter form a compelling solo exhibition that’s leaving viewers with a “wetted” appetite for more.

Davis Gallery & Framing in Austin, Texas, is excited to be presenting a solo exhibition this spring entitled “Water,” which features a new body of paintings by acclaimed artist Malou Flato. On view from April 15 through May 20, “Water” displays Flato’s elegant scenes of water, from delicate ripples to forceful flows.

Malou Flato, “Fresh Water,” 60 x 72 in. © Davis Gallery
Malou Flato, “Fresh Water,” 60 x 72 in. © Davis Gallery
Malou Flato, “Laguna Gloria,” 60 x 72 in. © Davis Gallery
Malou Flato, “Laguna Gloria,” 60 x 72 in. © Davis Gallery
Malou Flato, “Kickapoo Mint,” 40 x 40 in. © Davis Gallery
Malou Flato, “Kickapoo Mint,” 40 x 40 in. © Davis Gallery
Malou Flato, “Wet Roses,” 11 x 14 in. © Davis Gallery
Malou Flato, “Wet Roses,” 11 x 14 in. © Davis Gallery

“Over the course of her career,” the gallery writes, “Malou’s distinctive style has accumulated national acclaim. It is rare that an artist can move gracefully from dominating, large-scale canvases to more contemplative works. Bright pops of color are often amplified by subtle, muted washes and precise shifts between light and shadow. Malou’s newest series of paintings, Water, is expected to continue to impress.”

To learn more, visit Davis Gallery & Framing.

This article was featured in Fine Art Today, a weekly e-newsletter from Fine Art Connoisseur magazine. To start receiving Fine Art Today for free, click here.

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Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the Editor of Fine Art Today and works as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.

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