PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
"Lunenburg Dorymaker" by Alan Wylie, oil, 25 x 40 in.

Six times a year a PleinAir Salon juror has the challenging task of choosing some of the best art that’s being created today, outside of and within the art studio. Among categories such as “Best Still Life,” “Best Watercolor,” and more, eligible artists can enter their paintings in the “Best Over 65” group. To celebrate some of our recent winners who are over 65 years old, we bring you (in order by last name) the following:

PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#1 “Montara Morning 2” by Scott Anthony, 12 x 16 in.
PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#2 “Rhinos” by Dianne Bollentini, ink, 16 x 20 in.
PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#3 “Morning Light on Ruby Peak” by Leslie Leviner, oil, 12 x 16 in.
#4 “Mason in His Studio” by Stefan Mackey, oil, 20 x 24 in.
PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#5 “Be Still My Soul” by John Pototschnik, oil, 30 x 40 in.
PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#6 “On the Road to Mandalay” by William Schneider, oil, 24 x 18 in.
PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#7 “Susan L” by Richard Sneary, watercolor, 10 x 14 in.
PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#8 “Avalon Harbor Early Morning” by Randy Sprout, pen and ink with acrylics, 9 x 12 in.
PleinAir Salon winners - Artists Over 65
#9 “Lunenburg Dorymaker” by Alan Wylie, oil, 25 x 40 in.

There’s still time to enter the current PleinAir Salon art competition. Enter your best work by May 31 for your chance to win cash and publicity: PleinAirSalon.com


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2 COMMENTS

  1. I have entered the ‘over 65’ group… I rarely bother entering any contest because I paint from themes, visualizing abstract ideas, and tho am a representative artist, my world is from my head, not setting objects on a shelf and copying, as is the usual, but work from the mental image, which is based on objects from the world around me – same when doing landscapes, as everything in my works pertain to the theme involved, reflected in the theme/title… in entering, tho, this proved a problem in the past as it not follows the traditional landscape or still life in which the images come first then the theme is tried to be thought of, with, as such, extraneous items thus seen in the works which really not pertain to the theme… this has been so even in previous ‘oldsters’ entries from various contests seen in art mags… so I wonder – how does theming enter into your jurying? or is it just the visual which counts? does it make a difference? why or why not?

    • Hello! I’ve checked with one of our PleinAir Salon team members, who tells us, “These paintings are judged based on the category they entered and the quality of the work. For example, if an artist is entering the vehicles category, the painting needs to have a vehicle in it.” I hope this information helps, and if you enter I also wish you the best of luck!

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