Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio, “Head of a Woman,” circa 1495, metalpoint heightened with white, © The Clark Art Institute 2017

The 16th and 17th centuries were important periods of artistic exchange in Europe, especially with regard to prints and drawings. A captivating exhibition opened last week on the East Coast that delves into these mediums, from the Netherlands to Naples. Learn more here!

The Clark Art Institute’s world-class permanent collection of prints and drawings from the 16th and 17th centuries are currently on radiant display during “Looking North and South: European Prints and Drawings 1500-1650.” Opened on March 5 and continuing through May 29, the exhibition investigates the ways in which both Northern and Southern European artists engaged in artistic exchange through prints, drawings, and books.

Albrecht Dürer, “Adam and Eve,” 1504, engraving, © The Clark Art Institute 2017
Albrecht Dürer, “Adam and Eve,” 1504, engraving, © The Clark Art Institute 2017

Drawn exclusively from the institute’s permanent collection, “[the exhibition] considers how artists responded to the work of their contemporaries in different regions of early modern Europe, revealing intersections and divergences in artistic production and the important role played by works on paper — portable and more affordable than painting — in shaping the exchange of ideas,” according to the Clark.

Peter Paul Rubens, “Hercules Strangling the Nemean Lion,” circa 1620, color chalks, ink and gouache, © The Clark Art Institute 2017
Peter Paul Rubens, “Hercules Strangling the Nemean Lion,” circa 1620, color chalks, ink and gouache, © The Clark Art Institute 2017

Among the artists represented in the show are Albrecht Dürer, Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio, Jacopo Palma il Giovane, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Maarten de Vos, Giorgio Vasari, Rembrandt van Rijn, and Peter Paul Rubens. The Clark Art Institute is located in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

To learn more, visit The Clark Art Institute.

This article was featured in Fine Art Today, a weekly e-newsletter from Fine Art Connoisseur magazine. To start receiving Fine Art Today for free, click here.

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