John Banovich, “Clean Water,” oil on linen, 18 x 12 inches

The National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyoming, is celebrating 30 years of excellence this September during its annual Show & Sale. The show features a wide selection of art for sale, parties, panel discussions, and more. Details here!

There will soon be a lot going on in Jackson, Wyoming, at the National Museum of Wildlife Art (NMWA)! From Friday, September 8 through September 17, the NMWA will host its annual Western Visions Show & Sale. Although the event is met with widespread success each year, 2017 is special as the museum celebrates its 30th anniversary.

On the slate this year are several exciting events, including a Sculptor Panel Discussion with renowned sculptor Walter Matia, who will lecture on the history of animal sculpture from 1831 to 1975. Also hosted in 2017 will be a Benefactor Welcome Cocktail Party, an Artist Party, a Conversation with the Museum’s Curators Past & Present, and of course the Show & Sale.

“In honor of our 30th anniversary, the Show & Sale features artists whose work is in the Museum’s permanent collection,” the NMWA writes. All told, over 100 artists will be included in the show, representing the top wildlife artists in the world.

To learn more, visit the NMWA.

This article was featured in Fine Art Today, a weekly e-newsletter from Fine Art Connoisseur magazine. To start receiving Fine Art Today for free, click here.

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Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the Editor of Fine Art Today and works as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.

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