Paolo Veronese, “St. Jerome in the Wilderness (detail),” circa 1566-67, oil, Photo: Ufficio Beni Culturali del Patriarcato di Venezia

Following the conservation of two rarely seen paintings by the celebrated Venetian Paolo Veronese (1528-1588), the Frick Collection is proud to have recently opened a significant focus exhibition surrounding not just their creation, but the career of their remarkable creator.

Opened on October 24 and continuing through March 25th, 2018, at the Frick Collection in New York City, “Veronese in Murano: Two Venetian Renaissance Masterpieces Restored” is a brilliant exhibition that could turn out to be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The two focus paintings, “St. Jerome in the Wilderness” and “St. Agatha Visited in Prison by St. Peter,” have rarely left their homes in a church in Murano — an island in the lagoon of Venice. In fact, the St. Agatha piece hasn’t left since its installation in the early 19th century, while the St. Jerome work was last exhibited in 1939.

Paolo Veronese, “St. Jerome in the Wilderness,” circa 1566-67, oil, Photo: Ufficio Beni Culturali del Patriarcato di Venezia
Paolo Veronese, “St. Agatha Visited in Prison by St. Peter,” circa 1566-67, oil, Photo: Ufficio Beni Culturali del Patriarcato di Venezia
Paolo Veronese, “St. Agatha Visited in Prison by St. Peter (detail),” circa 1566-67, oil, Photo: Ufficio Beni Culturali del Patriarcato di Venezia
Paolo Veronese, “St. Jerome in the Wilderness (detail),” circa 1566-67, oil, Photo: Ufficio Beni Culturali del Patriarcato di Venezia

According to the museum, “Over the last year, the paintings have been fully restored by Venetian Heritage, thanks to the sponsorship of Bulgari, and their conservation was accompanied by thorough research into their history. The canvases are shown in the Frick’s Oval Room, which has been transformed into a chapel-like space in order to re-create the feeling of Francesco Degli Arbori’s chapel in Murano. The paintings date from the same time as the Frick’s two allegorical paintings by Veronese, ‘The Choice between Virtue and Vice’ and ‘Wisdom and Strength.’ Now hung in the Oval Room, the religious works create a fascinating dialogue with the allegories displayed in the adjacent West Gallery.”

To learn more, visit The Frick Collection.

This article was featured in Fine Art Today, a weekly e-newsletter from Fine Art Connoisseur magazine. To start receiving Fine Art Today for free, click here.

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Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the former Editor of Fine Art Today and worked as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.

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