Rembrandt drawings, etchings, and paintings
Rembrandt van Rijn, “Self-Portrait in a Cap, Wide-Eyed and Open-Mouthed,” about 1630. Etching and drypoint; 2.09 x 1.81 in. Bibliothèque nationale de France. Image courtesy of BnF.

Showcasing more than 100 of Rembrandt’s celebrated etchings, drawings, and paintings, this exhibition at the Denver Art Museum commemorates the 350th anniversary of his death.

From the Denver Art Museum:

The Denver Art Museum (DAM) will be the sole venue for “Rembrandt: Painter as Printmaker,” presenting new scholarship on rarely seen prints by Rembrandt van Rijn as well as related drawings and paintings. The exhibition, coinciding with the 350th anniversary of the Dutch artist’s death (1606–1669), will offer fresh insight into the life and career of the masterful printmaker. “Rembrandt: Painter as Printmaker” is organized by the DAM and co-curated by Dr. Timothy J. Standring, Gates Family Foundation Curator at the DAM, and leading scholar of Rembrandt prints Dr. Jaco Rutgers as a consulting curator.

Rembrandt drawings, etchings, and paintings
Rembrandt van Rijn, “Head of an Old Man with a Cap,” around 1630. Oil paint on panel; 9.56 x 8 in. Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada: Gift of Alfred and Isabel Bader, 2003. Image courtesy of Agnes Etherington Art Centre.

The chronological presentation of “Rembrandt: Painter as Printmaker” will showcase more than 100 prints, drawings, and paintings from the artist’s career, spanning from 1625 to 1665. The combination of extremely rare prints, presented alongside paintings and drawings depicting similar subjects, will draw visitors in closer to gain a deeper understanding of Rembrandt’s working habits as an artist, and moreover, as a printmaker. The exhibition also will take a close look at Rembrandt’s innovative approach to printmaking, which combined the three principle methods of intaglio, including etching, drypoint, and engraving. By balancing these techniques, Rembrandt was able to produce prints that were highly sought after during and following his lifetime.

“Rembrandt: Painter as Printmaker” is a unique opportunity for visitors to gain a deeper understanding of Rembrandt’s artistic personality, which is revealed through an illuminating presentation of his printmaking oeuvre,” said Christoph Heinrich, Frederick and Jan Mayer Director of the DAM. “Additionally, our visitors will see that Rembrandt was a remarkable storyteller through the finest impressions of his prints available worldwide. We look forward to sharing his incredible and timeless contribution as an artist.”

Unforgettable images of biblical, portrait, allegory, still life, landscape, and genre artworks of the time will be featured throughout “Rembrandt: Painter as Printmaker” to showcase the mastery that cemented Rembrandt as one of the greatest artists in history. The exhibition will demonstrate how Rembrandt used his view of the world around him to fuel his artistic journey, often using himself, family members, and neighbors as models. It also will expose the various types of paper he used throughout his artistic journey for printmaking, such as oriental paper, wrapping paper, and parchment, as well as European papers.

Rembrandt drawings, etchings, and paintings
Rembrandt van Rijn, “Christ Preaching – The Hundred Guilder Print,” about 1648. Etching, engraving and drypoint; 10.94 x 15.27 in. Bibliothèque nationale de France. Image courtesy of BnF.
Rembrandt drawings, etchings, and paintings
Rembrandt van Rijn, “Christ before Pilate,” 1635. Etching and engraving; 21.61 x 17.60 in. Bibliothèque nationale de France. Image courtesy of BnF.
Rembrandt drawings, etchings, and paintings
Rembrandt van Rijn, “The Three Trees,” 1643. Etching, engraving and drypoint; 8.38 x 10.98 in. Bibliothèque nationale de France. Image courtesy of BnF.

“Rembrandt: Painter as Printmaker” is on view at the Denver Art Museum (Colorado) September 16 through January 6, 2019. For more information, please visit denverartmuseum.org.


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