“After Thomas Gainsborough” (1727–1788), George IV when Prince of Wales, c. 1782–85, oil on canvas, 30 x 25 1/3 in., Royal Collection Trust © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
“After Thomas Gainsborough” (1727–1788), George IV when Prince of Wales, c. 1782–85, oil on canvas, 30 x 25 1/3 in., Royal Collection Trust © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Variously cast as a wastrel, builder of the Brighton Pavilion, or a slow-witted dupe, King George IV (1762–1830) is one of British history’s least understood figures. The exhibition “King George IV: Royalty, Racing and Reputation”, explores his legacy as not only a great art collector, but also as a prominent patron of horse racing.

All but one of the 42 artworks featured — including portraiture, etchings, and trophies — are being lent by Her Majesty The Queen. Palace House (The National Heritage Centre for Horseracing and Sporting Art) is an appropriate setting, as it was founded by King Charles II in the 1660s for his horse racing activities.

This show runs through April 19, 2020 and coincides with the exhibition “George IV: Art & Spectacle” on view at the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace through May 3 (and then at the Queen’s Gallery in Edinburgh).

For more information, please visit palacehousenewmarket.co.uk.


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