Although he passed in late 2014, the art and legacy of William Thomson endures during a retrospective.
A prolific painter and a fine person, William Thomson (1931-2014) took to heart the ways in which he communicated on canvas, and his memory and paintings are highlighted this month at Bowersock Gallery in Provincetown, Massachusetts. “He unleashed a power; an unseen energy pulsates throughout every landscape, figurative piece, and abstract,” the gallery recounts. “William Thomson was truly one of our great contemporary masters, and this exhibit is a stunner, evidence of his absolute excellence.”

William Thomson, “10th Tower,” encaustic on canvas, 35 x 30 in. (c) Bowersock Gallery 2015

William Thomson, “New England Cottage,” watercolor, 20 x 15 in. (c) Bowersock Gallery 2015

William Thomson, “Tattooed Man,” etching, 13 x 10 in. (c) Bowersock Gallery 2015

The retrospective will feature many of the artist’s familiar series, along with a few works that have never before been shown. Moreover, the Thomson’s ability to work in multiple mediums is showcased, as pieces in mixed media, acrylic, encaustic, tempera, oil, and watercolor will be on view.
“Retrospect: William Thomson, A Life of Beauty” opens on September 4.
To learn more, visit the Bowersock Gallery.  
This article was featured in Fine Art Today, a weekly e-newsletter from Fine Art Connoisseur magazine. To start receiving Fine Art Today for free, click here.

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Andrew Webster
Andrew Webster is the former Editor of Fine Art Today and worked as an editorial and creative marketing assistant for Streamline Publishing. Andrew graduated from The University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Art History and Ceramics. He then moved on to the University of Oregon, where he completed an M.A. in Art History. Studying under scholar Kathleen Nicholson, he completed a thesis project that investigated the peculiar practice of embedded self-portraiture within Christian imagery during the 15th and early 16th centuries in Italy.


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